https://klikhier768.blogspot.be/?book=0520297792
?I remember the four words that repeatedly scrolled across my mind after the first plane crashed into the World Trade Center in New York City. ?Please don?t be Muslims, please don?t be Muslims.? The four words I whispered to myself on 9/11 reverberated through the mind of every Muslim American that day and every day after.? Our fear, and the collective breath or brace for the hateful backlash that ensued, symbolize the existential tightrope that defines Muslim American identity today.? ? The term ?Islamophobia? may be fairly new, but irrational fear and hatred of Islam and Muslims is anything but. Though many speak of Islamophobia?s roots in racism, have we considered how anti-Muslim rhetoric is rooted in our legal system? ? Using his unique lens as a critical race theorist and law professor, Khaled A. Beydoun captures the many ways in which law, policy, and official state rhetoric have fueled the frightening resurgence of Islamophobia in the United States. Beydoun charts its long and terrible history, from the plight of enslaved African Muslims in the antebellum South and the laws prohibiting Muslim immigrants from becoming citizens to the ways the war on terror assigns blame for any terrorist act to Islam and the myriad trials Muslim Americans face in the Trump era. He passionately argues that by failing to frame Islamophobia as a system of bigotry endorsed and emboldened by law and carried out by government actors, U.S. society ignores the injury it inflicts on both Muslims and non-Muslims. Through the stories of Muslim Americans who have experienced Islamophobia across various racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic lines, Beydoun shares how U.S. laws shatter lives, whether directly or inadvertently. And with an eye toward benefiting society as a whole, he recommends ways for Muslim Americans and their allies to build coalitions with other groups. Like no book before it, American Islamophobia offers a robust and genuine portrait of Muslim America then and now.
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?I remember the four words that repeatedly scrolled across my mind after the first plane crashed into the World Trade Center in New York City. ?Please don?t be Muslims, please don?t be Muslims.? The four words I whispered to myself on 9/11 reverberated through the mind of every Muslim American that day and every day after.? Our fear, and the collective breath or brace for the hateful backlash that ensued, symbolize the existential tightrope that defines Muslim American identity today.? ? The term ?Islamophobia? may be fairly new, but irrational fear and hatred of Islam and Muslims is anything but. Though many speak of Islamophobia?s roots in racism, have we considered how anti-Muslim rhetoric is rooted in our legal system? ? Using his unique lens as a critical race theorist and law professor, Khaled A. Beydoun captures the many ways in which law, policy, and official state rhetoric have fueled the frightening resurgence of Islamophobia in the United States. Beydoun charts its long and terrible history, from the plight of enslaved African Muslims in the antebellum South and the laws prohibiting Muslim immigrants from becoming citizens to the ways the war on terror assigns blame for any terrorist act to Islam and the myriad trials Muslim Americans face in the Trump era. He passionately argues that by failing to frame Islamophobia as a system of bigotry endorsed and emboldened by law and carried out by government actors, U.S. society ignores the injury it inflicts on both Muslims and non-Muslims. Through the stories of Muslim Americans who have experienced Islamophobia across various racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic lines, Beydoun shares how U.S. laws shatter lives, whether directly or inadvertently. And with an eye toward benefiting society as a whole, he recommends ways for Muslim Americans and their allies to build coalitions with other groups. Like no book before it, American Islamophobia offers a robust and genuine portrait of Muslim America then and now.
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https://newsteler45.blogspot.com/?book=0520297792
?I remember the four words that repeatedly scrolled across my mind after the first plane crashed into the World Trade Center in New York City. ?Please don?t be Muslims, please don?t be Muslims.? The four words I whispered to myself on 9/11 reverberated through the mind of every Muslim American that day and every day after.? Our fear, and the collective breath or brace for the hateful backlash that ensued, symbolize the existential tightrope that defines Muslim American identity today.? ? The term ?Islamophobia? may be fairly new, but irrational fear and hatred of Islam and Muslims is anything but. Though many speak of Islamophobia?s roots in racism, have we considered how anti-Muslim rhetoric is rooted in our legal system? ? Using his unique lens as a critical race theorist and law professor, Khaled A. Beydoun captures the many ways in which law, policy, and official state rhetoric have fueled the frightening resurgence of Islamophobia in the United States. Beydoun charts its long and terrible history, from the plight of enslaved African Muslims in the antebellum South and the laws prohibiting Muslim immigrants from becoming citizens to the ways the war on terror assigns blame for any terrorist act to Islam and the myriad trials Muslim Americans face in the Trump era. He passionately argues that by failing to frame Islamophobia as a system of bigotry endorsed and emboldened by law and carried out by government actors, U.S. society ignores the injury it inflicts on both Muslims and non-Muslims. Through the stories of Muslim Americans who have experienced Islamophobia across various racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic lines, Beydoun shares how U.S. laws shatter lives, whether directly or inadvertently. And with an eye toward benefiting society as a whole, he recommends ways for Muslim Americans and their allies to build coalitions with other groups. Like no book before it, American Islamophobia offers a robust and genuine portrait of Muslim America then and now.
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?I remember the four words that repeatedly scrolled across my mind after the first plane crashed into the World Trade Center in New York City. ?Please don?t be Muslims, please don?t be Muslims.? The four words I whispered to myself on 9/11 reverberated through the mind of every Muslim American that day and every day after.? Our fear, and the collective breath or brace for the hateful backlash that ensued, symbolize the existential tightrope that defines Muslim American identity today.? ? The term ?Islamophobia? may be fairly new, but irrational fear and hatred of Islam and Muslims is anything but. Though many speak of Islamophobia?s roots in racism, have we considered how anti-Muslim rhetoric is rooted in our legal system? ? Using his unique lens as a critical race theorist and law professor, Khaled A. Beydoun captures the many ways in which law, policy, and official state rhetoric have fueled the frightening resurgence of Islamophobia in the United States. Beydoun charts its long and terrible history, from the plight of enslaved African Muslims in the antebellum South and the laws prohibiting Muslim immigrants from becoming citizens to the ways the war on terror assigns blame for any terrorist act to Islam and the myriad trials Muslim Americans face in the Trump era. He passionately argues that by failing to frame Islamophobia as a system of bigotry endorsed and emboldened by law and carried out by government actors, U.S. society ignores the injury it inflicts on both Muslims and non-Muslims. Through the stories of Muslim Americans who have experienced Islamophobia across various racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic lines, Beydoun shares how U.S. laws shatter lives, whether directly or inadvertently. And with an eye toward benefiting society as a whole, he recommends ways for Muslim Americans and their allies to build coalitions with other groups. Like no book before it, American Islamophobia offers a robust and genuine portrait of Muslim America then and now.
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[Read] ?I remember the four words that repeatedly scrolled across my mind after the first plane crashed into the World Trade Center in New York City. ?Please don?t be Muslims, please don?t be Muslims.? The four words I whispered to myself on 9/11 reverberated through the mind of every Muslim American that day and every day after.? Our fear, and the collective breath or brace for the hateful backlash that ensued, symbolize the existential tightrope that defines Muslim American identity today.? ? The term ?Islamophobia? may be fairly new, but irrational fear and hatred of Islam and Muslims is anything but. Though many speak of Islamophobia?s roots in racism, have we considered how anti-Muslim rhetoric is rooted in our legal system? ? Using his unique lens as a critical race theorist and law professor, Khaled A. Beydoun captures the many ways in which law, policy, and official state rhetoric have fueled the frightening resurgence of Islamophobia in the United States. Beydoun charts its long and terrible history, from the plight of enslaved African Muslims in the antebellum South and the laws prohibiting Muslim immigrants from becoming citizens to the ways the war on terror assigns blame for any terrorist act to Islam and the myriad trials Muslim Americans face in the Trump era. He passionately argues that by failing to frame Islamophobia as a system of bigotry endorsed and emboldened by law and carried out by government actors, U.S. society ignores the injury it inflicts on both Muslims and non-Muslims. Through the stories of Muslim Americans who have experienced Islamophobia across various racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic lines, Beydoun shares how U.S. laws shatter lives, whether directly or inadvertently. And with an eye toward benefiting society as a whole, he recommends ways for Muslim Americans and their allies to build coalitions with other groups. Like no book before it, American Islamophobia offers a robust and genuine portrait of Muslim America then and now. For Online

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?I remember the four words that repeatedly scrolled across my mind after the first plane crashed into the World Trade Center in New York City. ?Please don?t be Muslims, please don?t be Muslims.? The four words I whispered to myself on 9/11 reverberated through the mind of every Muslim American that day and every day after.? Our fear, and the collective breath or brace for the hateful backlash that ensued, symbolize the existential tightrope that defines Muslim American identity today.? ? The term ?Islamophobia? may be fairly new, but irrational fear and hatred of Islam and Muslims is anything but. Though many speak of Islamophobia?s roots in racism, have we considered how anti-Muslim rhetoric is rooted in our legal system? ? Using his unique lens as a critical race theorist and law professor, Khaled A. Beydoun captures the many ways in which law, policy, and official state rhetoric have fueled the frightening resurgence of Islamophobia in the United States. Beydoun charts its long and terrible history, from the plight of enslaved African Muslims in the antebellum South and the laws prohibiting Muslim immigrants from becoming citizens to the ways the war on terror assigns blame for any terrorist act to Islam and the myriad trials Muslim Americans face in the Trump era. He passionately argues that by failing to frame Islamophobia as a system of bigotry endorsed and emboldened by law and carried out by government actors, U.S. society ignores the injury it inflicts on both Muslims and non-Muslims. Through the stories of Muslim Americans who have experienced Islamophobia across various racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic lines, Beydoun shares how U.S. laws shatter lives, whether directly or inadvertently. And with an eye toward benefiting society as a whole, he recommends ways for Muslim Americans and their allies to build coalitions with other groups. Like no book before it, American Islamophobia offers a robust and genuine portrait of Muslim America then and now.
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?I remember the four words that repeatedly scrolled across my mind after the first plane crashed into the World Trade Center in New York City. ?Please don?t be Muslims, please don?t be Muslims.? The four words I whispered to myself on 9/11 reverberated through the mind of every Muslim American that day and every day after.? Our fear, and the collective breath or brace for the hateful backlash that ensued, symbolize the existential tightrope that defines Muslim American identity today.? ? The term ?Islamophobia? may be fairly new, but irrational fear and hatred of Islam and Muslims is anything but. Though many speak of Islamophobia?s roots in racism, have we considered how anti-Muslim rhetoric is rooted in our legal system? ? Using his unique lens as a critical race theorist and law professor, Khaled A. Beydoun captures the many ways in which law, policy, and official state rhetoric have fueled the frightening resurgence of Islamophobia in the United States. Beydoun charts its long and terrible history, from the plight of enslaved African Muslims in the antebellum South and the laws prohibiting Muslim immigrants from becoming citizens to the ways the war on terror assigns blame for any terrorist act to Islam and the myriad trials Muslim Americans face in the Trump era. He passionately argues that by failing to frame Islamophobia as a system of bigotry endorsed and emboldened by law and carried out by government actors, U.S. society ignores the injury it inflicts on both Muslims and non-Muslims. Through the stories of Muslim Americans who have experienced Islamophobia across various racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic lines, Beydoun shares how U.S. laws shatter lives, whether directly or inadvertently. And with an eye toward benefiting society as a whole, he recommends ways for Muslim Americans and their allies to build coalitions with other groups. Like no book before it, American Islamophobia offers a robust and genuine portrait of Muslim America then and now.
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?I remember the four words that repeatedly scrolled across my mind after the first plane crashed into the World Trade Center in New York City. ?Please don?t be Muslims, please don?t be Muslims.? The four words I whispered to myself on 9/11 reverberated through the mind of every Muslim American that day and every day after.? Our fear, and the collective breath or brace for the hateful backlash that ensued, symbolize the existential tightrope that defines Muslim American identity today.? ? The term ?Islamophobia? may be fairly new, but irrational fear and hatred of Islam and Muslims is anything but. Though many speak of Islamophobia?s roots in racism, have we considered how anti-Muslim rhetoric is rooted in our legal system? ? Using his unique lens as a critical race theorist and law professor, Khaled A. Beydoun captures the many ways in which law, policy, and official state rhetoric have fueled the frightening resurgence of Islamophobia in the United States. Beydoun charts its long and terrible history, from the plight of enslaved African Muslims in the antebellum South and the laws prohibiting Muslim immigrants from becoming citizens to the ways the war on terror assigns blame for any terrorist act to Islam and the myriad trials Muslim Americans face in the Trump era. He passionately argues that by failing to frame Islamophobia as a system of bigotry endorsed and emboldened by law and carried out by government actors, U.S. society ignores the injury it inflicts on both Muslims and non-Muslims. Through the stories of Muslim Americans who have experienced Islamophobia across various racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic lines, Beydoun shares how U.S. laws shatter lives, whether directly or inadvertently. And with an eye toward benefiting society as a whole, he recommends ways for Muslim Americans and their allies to build coalitions with other groups. Like no book before it, American Islamophobia offers a robust and genuine portrait of Muslim America then and now.
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Alex Azar is a Big Pharma exec, who advocates for raising drug prices for those in need, and is the guy Trump put in charge of lowering drug prices for those in need.

Alex Michael Azar ll was born in Johnstown, Pennsylvania in 1967 to parents who were so apolitical, he didn’t know which side of the aisle they were on. Starved of a passed down political opinion, a young Azar formed his own. By third grade, he had a subscription to Conservative Digest.

Azar attended Dartmouth, where he was a member of the Kappa Kappa Kappa fraternity, graduating in 1988. After Dartmouth, Azar graduated from Yale Law School in 1991, a year after classmate, Brett Kavanaugh.

After Yale, Azar clerked for a judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. But, according to Politico, just about six weeks after his start, he was reportedly fired and replaced by Brett Kavanaugh. So in a way, perhaps if Azar had done a better job at keeping his job, Kavanaugh wouldn’t have obtained the resume needed to one day secure a lifetime appointment on the United States Supreme Court

Azar went on to clerk for Justice Antonin Scalia. After parting ways with him, Azar played a role as an assistant independent counsel in the Whitewater investigation, where Kavanaugh joined him. Then, he went to bat as a lawyer for George W. Bush during the infamous 2000 Florida recount, which Bush won before the manual recount was completed. Azar’s questionable legal tactics secured him a role on the transition team, where—according to the Washington Post—he screened “potential senior White House staff and Cabinet members.” It’s unclear if Azar screened and put in a good word for people like Donald Rumsfeld.

Bush’s HHS secretary, Tommy Thompson, picked Azar to be the department’s general counsel—quite possibly because—according to a 2001 Washington Post report—HHS was looking to scale back “efforts to promote family planning and contraception” while “aggressively promoting abstinence-only programs.” Azar resigned from his post in 2007, before going to work for one of the 15 largest drug companies in the world: Eli Lilly. Before Azar took over as Lilly’s VP of corporate affairs and communications, the company was swept up in scandal. Lilly illegally marketed unapproved uses for one of their drugs intended to treat bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, and pushed it on nursing homes for off-label uses like dementia, without any proof that it would work.

In 2012, Azar was promoted to President of Lilly USA, the company’s largest affiliate. Under Azar’s leadership, the company significantly raised its drug prices. Lilly more than doubled the U.S. list price of their top-selling insulin, which increased from $123 per vial in 2012 to $255 when Azar left in 2017.

In 2017, after he raised drug prices at Lilly, Trump - for some reason - decided to put him in charge of lowering drug prices as Secretary of Health and Human Services. Trump tweeted, “Happy to announce, I am nominating Alex Azar to be the next HHS Secretary. He will be a star for better health care and lower drug prices!” Critics were quick to close in. Bernie Sanders fired back, “Trump was clearly never serious about his promise to lower drug prices. We need an HHS secretary who will take on the drug industry's greed, not someone who has financially benefited from it.”

Azar has focused on several anti-abortion measures. Equity Forward, a watchdog organization which examines anti-reproductive health groups and individuals, notes, Azar’s “shocking moves include hurting women’s health by targeting the ACA birth control mandate, pushing to finalize the domestic gagrule and moving to backtrack federal regulations around gender discrimination.” Azar was also left in charge of the migrant children detained in U.S. facilities. His HHS was unprepared for the amount of children in their custody and facilities quickly reached capacity. Between September 2018 and May 2019, six children died either in U.S. custody or shortly after leaving. Some newly reunited children also showed signs of severe psychological trauma. Meanwhile, Azar claimed the work the HHS was doing to separate children from their parents was "one of the great acts of American generosity" and also life saving.

It’s unclear where Azar will go from here, but if his history of pricing drugs is any indication, it’s probably up!

This video, "Who Is Alex Azar? Narrated by Paul Scheer", first appeared on
nowthisnews.com.
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The Incredibles (2004)

This Pixar film directed by Brad Bird is so full of speeches extolling individualism, it sometimes sounds like an Ayn Rand novel (in fact, Rand is clearly part of inspiration for the character of Edna Bird). Even the supervillain in The Incredibles is a creature of self-invention and self-improvement. While the Incredibles are born with their powers, Syndrome is a normie who worships Mr. Incredible and is desperate to be his sidekick.

Like an animated version of Richard Nixon, Syndrome's ambition ultimately gets the best of him.

The Barbarian Invasions (2003)

Québécois director Denys Arcand's brilliant sequel to The Decline of the American Empire is the single-best depiction of the depredations of socialized medicine. Canada's health-care system is so sclerotic that the movie's protagonist, a retired academic named Rémy, cannot even score the drugs he needs to commit suicide until his estranged son, a banker, buys them on the black market.

Even more disturbing is the moment when the terminally ill Rémy and his former colleagues admit that their intellectual faddishness led them to embrace every awful left-wing "ism" of the past 30 years despite their massive human toll.

Dallas Buyers Club (2013)

Set in the 1980s, Matthew McConaughey plays Ron Woodroof, a boozey roughneck who is given 30 days to live after being diagnosed with AIDS. Faced with a death sentence, he schools himself on a wide variety of treatments, first in Mexico and then all over the world. With the help of a cross-dressing party girl named Rayon, Woodroof skirts FDA prohibitions against importing, using, and selling unapproved drugs by creating a "buyers club," in which members pay a monthly fee and assume all risks.

The depiction of official indifference to patient suffering and the bureaucratic quashing of medical freedom even for people who are certain to die is inspirational, especially now that even Donald Trump has endorsed "right-to-try" legislation that would allow terminally ill patients access to non-approved medicines.

Joy (2015)

Jennifer Lawrence became a mega-star playing the anti-government rebel Katniss Everdeen in The Hunger Games movies. While there's no shortage of libertarian sentiment coursing through that trilogy, it's actually a quieter movie starring Lawrence that embodies libertarian virtues of hard work, commercial innovation, and entrepreneurship.

In Joy, Lawrence plays real-life "Miracle Mop" inventor Joy Magano, who helped make cleaning your floors easier while making herself rich. The film is nothing less than a paean to capitalism's genius at allowing self-expression and self-fulfillment.

In a dramatic scene with Bradley Cooper, who plays an executive at a home-shopping network, Joy summarizes in a few sentences what it took Joseph Schumpeter, Friedrich Hayek, and Milton Friedman whole books to say:

As former Reason Editor Virginia Postrel wrote, the film "acknowledges the wealth-creating value of incremental improvements even in the most mundane items."

Ghostbusters (1984)

Released in 1984, Ghostbusters quickly became one of most successful comedies in film history.

The movie was perfectly in synch with the Reagan Revolution's valorization of business and demonization of government. Ghostbusters begins with a team of paranormal investigators getting kicked out of Columbia University and starting a ghost-hunting business. But even though New York is literally being invaded by evil spirits, the real villain of the movie is not the otherwordly demon Gozer but an Environmental Protection Agency bureaucrat named Walter Peck, who shuts down their operation and puts the city at risk.

Well, what do you think? How far off the mark are we? What great libertarian movies would you add to the list? Let us know in the comments.

Produced by Todd Krainin. Written and narrated by Nick Gillespie.
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