https://goodideas22.blogspot.com/?book=0316257575
In this ?vital book for these times? (Kirkus Reviews), Don Lemon brings his vast audience and experience as a reporter and a Black man to today?s most urgent question: How can we end racism in America in our lifetimes??The host of CNN Tonight with Don Lemon is more popular than ever. As America?s only Black prime-time anchor, Lemon and his daily monologues on racism and antiracism, on the failures of the Trump administration and of so many of our leaders, and on America?s systemic flaws speak for his millions of fans. Now, in an urgent, deeply personal, riveting plea, he shows us all how deep our problems lie, and what we can do to begin to fix them.Beginning with a letter to one of his Black nephews, he proceeds with reporting and reflections on his slave ancestors, his upbringing in the shadows of segregation, and his adult confrontations with politicians, activists, and scholars. In doing so, Lemon offers a searing and poetic ultimatum to America. He visits the slave port where a direct ancestor was shackled and shipped to America. He recalls a slave uprising in Louisiana, just a few miles from his birthplace. And he takes us to the heart of the 2020 protests in New York City. As he writes to his young nephew: We must resist racism every single day. We must resist it with love.
Uploaded by NettieBains | Length 00:00:38 | 0 views

The alder shudders in the April winds
off the moon. No one is awake and yet
sunlight streams across
the hundred still beds
of the public wards
for children. At ten
do we truly sleep
in a blessed sleep
guarded by angels
and social workers?
Do we dream of gold
found in secret trunks
in familiar rooms?
Do we talk to cats
and dogs? I think not.
I think when I was
ten I was almost
an adult, slightly
less sentimental
than now and better
with figures. No one
could force me to cry,
nothing could convince
me of God's concern
for America
much less the fall of
a sparrow. I spit
into the wind, even
on mornings like this,
the air clear, the sky
utterly silent,
the fresh light flooding
across bed after
bed as though something
were reaching blindly --
for we are blindest
in sunlight -- for hands
to take and eyelids
to caress and bless
before they open
to the alder gone
still and the winds hushed,
before the children
waken separately
into their childhoods.

Philip Levine

http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/in-a-light-time/
Uploaded by poemhunter | Length 00:01:51 | 18 views

https://brodymod.blogspot.com/?book=0316257575
In this ?vital book for these times? (Kirkus Reviews), Don Lemon brings his vast audience and experience as a reporter and a Black man to today?s most urgent question: How can we end racism in America in our lifetimes??The host of CNN Tonight with Don Lemon is more popular than ever. As America?s only Black prime-time anchor, Lemon and his daily monologues on racism and antiracism, on the failures of the Trump administration and of so many of our leaders, and on America?s systemic flaws speak for his millions of fans. Now, in an urgent, deeply personal, riveting plea, he shows us all how deep our problems lie, and what we can do to begin to fix them.Beginning with a letter to one of his Black nephews, he proceeds with reporting and reflections on his slave ancestors, his upbringing in the shadows of segregation, and his adult confrontations with politicians, activists, and scholars. In doing so, Lemon offers a searing and poetic ultimatum to America. He visits the slave port where a direct ancestor was shackled and shipped to America. He recalls a slave uprising in Louisiana, just a few miles from his birthplace. And he takes us to the heart of the 2020 protests in New York City. As he writes to his young nephew: We must resist racism every single day. We must resist it with love.
Uploaded by dm_7eff560380ba9e8c0df193e4585acd9b | Length 00:00:33 | 0 views

the pleasant night is over,
do not know when you will arrive..............
worlds weather has changed,
do not know when you will arrive,
the sights their ruptures
shown, have gone to sleep,
the stars their luminence
stripped ,have gone to sleep
every lamp has gone out
do not know when you will arrive,
the plesant night is over,
here ,we re suffering agitation in your expectation ,
in your expectation.......in your expectation.............................
shades of autumin is creeping in the time of blossom,
even the wind has changed its course
dont know when you will arrive,
this is a soothing,sweet,romantic song from 1949.....
film-dulari
music naushad
lyrics-shakil badayuni
siger-mohmmed rafi
stars-madubala/suresh/
Uploaded by nomiyanagee | Length 00:03:18 | 496 views

https://micin-seller.blogspot.co.uk/?book=1557286574
More than seventy-five years after its publication, Gone with the Wind remains thoroughly embedded in American culture. Margaret Mitchell?s novel and the film produced by David O. Selznick have melded with the broader forces of southern history, southern mythology, and marketing to become, and remain, a cultural phenomenon.A Tough Little Patch of History (the phrase was coined by a journalist in 1996 to describe the Margaret Mitchell home after it was spared from destruction by fire) explores how Gone with the Wind has remained an important component of public memory in Atlanta through an analysis of museums and historic sites that focus on this famous work of fiction. Jennifer W. Dickey explores how the book and film threw a spotlight on Atlanta, which found itself simultaneously presented as an emblem of both the Old South and the New South. Exhibitions produced by the Atlanta History Center related to Gone with the Wind are explored, along with nearby Clayton County?s claim to fame as ?the Home of Gone with the Wind,? a moniker bestowed on the county by Margaret Mitchell?s estate in 1969. There?s a recounting of the saga of ?the Dump,? the tiny apartment in midtown Atlanta where Margaret Mitchell wrote the book, and how this place became a symbol for all that was right and all that was wrong with Mitchell?s writing.
Uploaded by dm_6cff025cd9e0c287f8126e3b95c007c7 | Length 00:00:37 | 0 views

On Riz Khan, live from New York City, we debate the Durban II world conference set up to fight racism and racial discrimination.

We will speak with Hillel Neuer, the executive director of UN Watch, who argues that the current preparatory meetings for Durban II ignore key issues in Africa in favour of chastising Israel.

Israel and the US pulled out of Durban I, claiming it was anti-semitic, and Neuer believes that the only way to avert a similar disaster at Durban II (to be held in Geneva, Switzerland, in April 2009) is for the EU to threaten a boycott.

Joining the programme from London, Islamic Human Rights Commission Chair Massoud Shadjareh argues that Durban II should move forward as planned and that putting the issue of Israel's treatment of the Palestinians is necessary if racism is to be truly addressed.
Uploaded by aljazeeraenglish | Length 00:09:44 | 3 views

At G & S Enterprises, we focus on providing you with a solution to your situation so you can continue to do the things you love. We want your house! “I want to ( https://www.gsbuyshomes.com/sell-my-house-nc/ ) sell my house fast in Charlotte NC” So what do you have to lose?

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Uploaded by gsbuyshomes123 | Length 00:00:49 | 2 views

On Riz Khan, live from New York City, we debate the Durban II world conference set up to fight racism and racial discrimination.

We will speak with Hillel Neuer, the executive director of UN Watch, who argues that the current preparatory meetings for Durban II ignore key issues in Africa in favour of chastising Israel.

Israel and the US pulled out of Durban I, claiming it was anti-semitic, and Neuer believes that the only way to avert a similar disaster at Durban II (to be held in Geneva, Switzerland, in April 2009) is for the EU to threaten a boycott.

Joining the programme from London, Islamic Human Rights Commission Chair Massoud Shadjareh argues that Durban II should move forward as planned and that putting the issue of Israel's treatment of the Palestinians is necessary if racism is to be truly addressed.
Uploaded by aljazeeraenglish | Length 00:12:29 | 3 views

https://nn.readpdfonline.xyz/?book=1557286574
More than seventy-five years after its publication, Gone with the Wind remains thoroughly embedded in American culture. Margaret Mitchell?s novel and the film produced by David O. Selznick have melded with the broader forces of southern history, southern mythology, and marketing to become, and remain, a cultural phenomenon.A Tough Little Patch of History (the phrase was coined by a journalist in 1996 to describe the Margaret Mitchell home after it was spared from destruction by fire) explores how Gone with the Wind has remained an important component of public memory in Atlanta through an analysis of museums and historic sites that focus on this famous work of fiction. Jennifer W. Dickey explores how the book and film threw a spotlight on Atlanta, which found itself simultaneously presented as an emblem of both the Old South and the New South. Exhibitions produced by the Atlanta History Center related to Gone with the Wind are explored, along with nearby Clayton County?s claim to fame as ?the Home of Gone with the Wind,? a moniker bestowed on the county by Margaret Mitchell?s estate in 1969. There?s a recounting of the saga of ?the Dump,? the tiny apartment in midtown Atlanta where Margaret Mitchell wrote the book, and how this place became a symbol for all that was right and all that was wrong with Mitchell?s writing.
Uploaded by dm_f925383e27cd2b6a0edf2ba75d598453 | Length 00:00:38 | 1 views

Former President Barack Obama suggested on Monday that “mommy issues” are holding America back.


Former President Barack Obama suggested on Monday that "mommy issues" are holding America back, reports the Kansas City Star. During a speech at the Obama Foundation Summit, he addressed the country's lack of progress on important matters including education and climate change.  He then commented: "The reason we don't do it is because we are still confused, blind, shrouded with hate, anger, racism, mommy issues."  "We are fraught with stuff, and so if that is the case, then the single most important thing we have to invest in is...people," Obama further noted. "We have got to get people to figure out how they work together in a cooperative, thoughtful, constructive way."  In a later discussion with author Dave Eggers, the former president said he still believes that if given the choice of a place and time to live, people would pick the United States. 
He added: "You'd choose now – or maybe two years ago."
Uploaded by GeoBeats | Length 00:01:12 | 5 views

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