Appearing as a panelist on an Al Jazeera debate on the issue, former BJP MP Tarun Vijay chose to deny that attacks on Africans had anything to do with racism. He rubbished allegations of racism in India, saying:, "If we were racist, why would we have the entire south (India)? Which is you know, completely Tamil, you know Kerala, you know Karnataka and Andhra. Why do we live with them? We have blacks, black people around us. You are denying your own nation, you are denying your ancestry, you are denying your culture."

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Uploaded by oneindia | Length 00:01:18 | 12 views

https://micin-seller.blogspot.co.uk/?book=1557286574
More than seventy-five years after its publication, Gone with the Wind remains thoroughly embedded in American culture. Margaret Mitchell?s novel and the film produced by David O. Selznick have melded with the broader forces of southern history, southern mythology, and marketing to become, and remain, a cultural phenomenon.A Tough Little Patch of History (the phrase was coined by a journalist in 1996 to describe the Margaret Mitchell home after it was spared from destruction by fire) explores how Gone with the Wind has remained an important component of public memory in Atlanta through an analysis of museums and historic sites that focus on this famous work of fiction. Jennifer W. Dickey explores how the book and film threw a spotlight on Atlanta, which found itself simultaneously presented as an emblem of both the Old South and the New South. Exhibitions produced by the Atlanta History Center related to Gone with the Wind are explored, along with nearby Clayton County?s claim to fame as ?the Home of Gone with the Wind,? a moniker bestowed on the county by Margaret Mitchell?s estate in 1969. There?s a recounting of the saga of ?the Dump,? the tiny apartment in midtown Atlanta where Margaret Mitchell wrote the book, and how this place became a symbol for all that was right and all that was wrong with Mitchell?s writing.
Uploaded by marciruu12 | Length 00:00:37 | 0 views

https://clicktofreeacces.blogspot.com/?book=1541645537
The classic work on American racism and the struggle for racial justice, now with a new foreword by Michelle AlexanderIn Faces at the Bottom of the Well, civil rights activist and legal scholar Derrick Bell uses allegory and historical example to argue that racism is an integral and permanent part of American society. African American struggles for equality are doomed to fail so long as the majority of whites do not see their own well-being threatened by the status quo. Bell calls on African Americans to face up to this unhappy truth and abandon a misplaced faith in inevitable progress. Only then will blacks, and those whites who join with them, be in a position to create viable strategies to alleviate the burdens of racism. "Freed of the stifling rigidity of relying unthinkingly on the slogan 'we shall overcome,'" he writes, "we are impelled both to live each day more fully and to examine critically the actual effectiveness of traditional civil rights remedies."With a new foreword by Michelle Alexander, Faces at the Bottom of the Well is urgent and essential reading on the problem of racism in America.
Uploaded by aazim.whitman | Length 00:00:34 | 1 views

https://dantalion1umni.blogspot.com/?book=1509524428
How can colorblindness - the idea that race does not matter - be racist? This illuminating book introduces the paradox of colorblind racism: how dismissing or downplaying the realities of race and racism can perpetuate inequality and violence. Drawing on a range of theoretical approaches and real-life examples, Meghan Burke reveals colorblind racism to be an insidious presence in many areas of institutional and everyday life in the United States. She explains what is meant by colorblind racism, uncovers its role in the history of racial discrimination, and explores its effects on how we talk about and treat race today. The book also engages with recent critiques of colorblind racism to show the limitations of this framework and how a deeper, more careful study of colorblindness is needed to understand the persistence of racism and how it may be challenged. This accessible book will be an invaluable overview of a key phenomenon for students across the social sciences, and its far-reaching insights will appeal to all interested in the social life of race and racism.
Uploaded by ebfwep | Length 00:00:30 | 0 views

“You don’t have to be a full-on racist, just being a tiny bit racist is enough,” Kiwi director Taika Waititi says in a video for the New Zealand Human Rights Commission.

“Racism needs your help to survive.”

The New Zealander of the Year, known for What We Do in the Shadows and the upcoming Thor: Ragnarok, launched a tongue-in-cheek campaign on June 14 for those “suffering in silence” from racism. Race Relations Commissioner Susan Devoy, speaking with Radio NZ, said one in three formal complaints to the Human Rights Commission were about racial discrimination.

She said Waititi was an obvious choice for the “Give Nothing to Racism” campaign and said he took a day off from working on Thor to shoot this video. The campaign site states that “racism starts small and is a light feeder” and the sarcastic humour used by Waititi could “stop casual racism from growing into something more extreme.” Credit: New Zealand Human Rights Commission via Storyful


Uploaded by storyfulnews | Length 00:01:50 | 13 views

https://dantalion1umni.blogspot.com/?book=0805050272
One of our country's premier cultural and social critics, bell hooks has always maintained that eradicating racism and eradicating sexism must go hand in hand. But whereas many women have been recognized for their writing on gender politics, the female voice has been all but locked out of the public discourse on race.Killing Rage speaks to this imbalance. These twenty-three essays are written from a black and feminist perspective, and they tackle the bitter difficulties of racism by envisioning a world without it. They address a spectrum of topics having to do with race and racism in the United States: psychological trauma among African Americans; friendship between black women and white women; anti-Semitism and racism; and internalized racism in movies and the media. And in the title essay, hooks writes about the "killing rage"?the fierce anger of black people stung by repeated instances of everyday racism?finding in that rage a healing source of love and strength and a catalyst for positive change.bell hooks is Distinguished Professor of English at City College of New York. She is the author of the memoir Bone Black as well as eleven other books. She lives in New York City.
Uploaded by azuhu | Length 00:00:33 | 6 views

Moving on surface of earth by his mercy and kind,
Thinking for several times address we do not find.
We search for our addresses asking each other,
Wait please, you will get, strangers say us further.

We do exist neither in mind nor in crowd or wind,
We vibrate frequently and search as does a blind.
By the help of stick a blind moves here and there,
Although he gets his path, for our path we do not care.

Where do we run? Why do we run behind matter?
What is there exactly? That we understand better?
Some they open their doors, some close the shutter,
Some love to be thinner, some love to be fatter.

Why do we hang between certain and uncertain?
What does it that fluctuates? The secret does contain.
How can we move to the length that we do attain?
Why do not we know the cause of the pattern?

Where are our visions? Truly now where are we?
How can we identify? The path how can we see?
Who does charge rent? Who does pay the fee?
Where are our actions? How can we able to bend knee?

Pintu Mahakul

http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/where-are-we-11/
Uploaded by poemhunter | Length 00:01:28 | 3 views

Under The Skin with Russell Brand | #136 Revolution Is Possible! (with Prof. Kehinde Andrews)
This week we have returning guest Prof. Kehinde Andrews.

Kehinde is an academic, activist and author. He is the Professor of Black Studies at Birmingham City University; the Director of the Centre for Critical Social Research; founder of the Organisation of Black Unity; and co-chair of the Black Studies Association.

This podcast digs deep into the core, historical and economical reasons behind racism not just in America but globally. Kehinde explains the route to real change and what needs to happen in order for a global revolution to take place. What do we have to sacrifice to make this happen? And are we willing to go through with it?

His books include Back to Black: Retelling Black Radicalism for the 21st Century and Resisting Racism: Race, Inequality and the Black Supplementary School Movement.
Uploaded by RadioProgram | Length 00:14:24 | 23 views

https://clicktofreeacces.blogspot.com/?book=1541645537
The classic work on American racism and the struggle for racial justice, now with a new foreword by Michelle AlexanderIn Faces at the Bottom of the Well, civil rights activist and legal scholar Derrick Bell uses allegory and historical example to argue that racism is an integral and permanent part of American society. African American struggles for equality are doomed to fail so long as the majority of whites do not see their own well-being threatened by the status quo. Bell calls on African Americans to face up to this unhappy truth and abandon a misplaced faith in inevitable progress. Only then will blacks, and those whites who join with them, be in a position to create viable strategies to alleviate the burdens of racism. "Freed of the stifling rigidity of relying unthinkingly on the slogan 'we shall overcome,'" he writes, "we are impelled both to live each day more fully and to examine critically the actual effectiveness of traditional civil rights remedies."With a new foreword by Michelle Alexander, Faces at the Bottom of the Well is urgent and essential reading on the problem of racism in America.
Uploaded by abdishakur.sayid | Length 00:00:34 | 10 views

Friendship was once floating in the air
Waiting for someone to catch it
You and I saw it
And each took a piece
Then a chain bound our hearts together

The first weeks were happy and gay
Cheerful with melodical glee
Sharing cakes and candies
Is what we’ve done best
And said our friendship will never end

But towards the last days of the year
I’m in great sympathy
You forgot I’m your friend
And left me alone
Never thinking I was there

Where has friendship gone? I ask myself
My mind is full of pictures of you
The things we shared together
Like the rotten teeth we used to have
But now it’s all gone with the wind

Will it ever come back or never again?
I’m waiting for you to return
I know that friendship
Is floating somewhere
And we can start over once more

Kryzl Deanne Pascual

http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/gone-with-the-wind-20/
Uploaded by poemhunter | Length 00:01:13 | 11 views

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